Mercy Centerville adds chest compression system

Submitted photoAngel Litke, ER Manager at Mercy Medical Center-Centerville, poses next to the new LUCAS 3 Chest Compression System now at the Centerville hospital.

Mercy Medical Center-Centerville received an important lifesaving tool in their emergency room. The hospital announced the acquisition of a LUCAS 3 Chest Compression System.

From remote regions to the busiest metropolitan areas, the Lucas Chest Compression System has complemented rescuer efforts in saving sudden cardiac arrest victims in more than 80 countries.

The LUCAS 3 is a mechanical chest compression system that provides compressions at a rate and depth that are consistent with current American Heart Association (AHA) and European Resuscitation Council (ERC) (guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Both portable and quick to apply, the device works by providing continuous high-quality chest compressions which are critical to maintaining blood flow to save a sudden cardiac arrest patient’s brain, heart and vital organs.

By providing consistent, high-quality chest compressions, the LUCAS 3 can free up personnel to let them focus on other critical emergency patient care such as defibrillation intubation, IV placement and transportation. The LUCAS 3 can also provide high-quality compressions in situations where manual CPR may be dangerous or challenging for providers.

“The Physio-Control LUCAS 3 Chest Compression System is a great addition to our operations. Both our patients and rescuers will benefit from this device’s unique abilities to provide lifesaving services efficiently and effectively,” said Angel Litke, ER Manager. According to Litke the device has already been used on a patient in a code blue situation.

LUCAS is the world’s most-used mechanical CPR device by installed base and is support by the highest level of clinical evidence, with more than 99 percent of patients treated with LUCAS having a good neurological outcome1 in one major study.

Funding for the system was provided through a $6.3 million grant to the Iowa Department of Public Health from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust to help save lives of people suffering cardiac arrest across Iowa.

In 2009, the Helmsley Charitable Foundation created its rural healthcare program to improve access and quality of care in the upper Midwest. In 2012, the Centerville hospital was a recipient of $430,000 grant from the Helmsley Charitable Trust for a digital mammography system.

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