Ad-Express and Daily Iowegian, Centerville, IA

November 28, 2013

Bone marrow registry drive scheduled


The Daily Iowegian

---- — “When you are handed lemons, make lemonade.” This saying has proven true for Unionville, Mo. resident Lisa Tribble. In September Lisa received the devastating diagnosis of plasma cell leukemia. Immediately she began chemotherapy and will be undergoing a stem cell transplant in January.

Lisa has always displayed an attitude of helping others; serving on the Putnam County Health Department Board, teaching math and Putnam County R-I and volunteering at the hospital, among other things. Her quest to help others has ramped into high gear since her diagnosis. Lisa has initiated a bone marrow registry drive which will be held the first two weeks of December.

“What better way is there to help someone than to save a life?” said Tribble.

Putnam County National Honor Society members are partnering with Tribble to conduct the Delete Blood Cancer drive, which will kick off at the Border Wa Tournament Dec. 3. A registry table will be located in the high school commons each night of the tournament and on Dec. 12 when Putnam County plays Novinger.

NHS members will also go to local businesses and register employees, saving them the trip to school. Businesses will be contacted with registry information and then appointments will be made for the actual registration procedure.

The process to register takes only 10 minutes and is quite simple. A form is completed and two swabs are taken from inside the mouth. The swabs are sealed up and sent for processing.

Applicants must be between the ages of 18 and 55, in general good health, and not have major prior medical issues such as cancer, stroke, hepatitis, etc.

Registration is free. However, the Delete Blood Cancer organization must spend $65 to process each person. Donations will be accepted to defray the cost. Many residents will not be eligible to register due to age or health issues, but a donation to the organization will help save lives.

A bone marrow transplant is a lifesaving treatment for people with leukemia, lymphoma and many other blood diseases. First, patients undergo chemotherapy and sometimes radiation to destroy their diseased marrow. Then, a donor’s health blood-forming cells are given directly into the patient’s bloodstream, where they can begin to function and multiply. For a patient’s body to accept these health cells, the patient needs a donor who is a close match.

Questions about the process and times to register can be answered by contacting Mary Comstock at the school, (660) 947-3361, ext. 303 or at mcomstock@putnamcoutyr1.net.