Ad-Express and Daily Iowegian, Centerville, IA

May 13, 2013

Mercy recognizes extraordinary nurses


The Daily Iowegian

---- — A nurse at Mercy Medical Center - Centerville was honored with The DAISY Award for extraordinary nurses. The award is part of The DAISY Foundation’s program to recognize the super-human efforts nurses perform every day.

Sadie Monaghan, RN, in the medical-surgical department, was honored with the 2013 DAISY Award. Monaghan was described as an all-around outstanding nurse with exceptional clinical skills and an unmatched compassion for her patients.

One person described their friends experience with Monaghan.

“Many nurses came and cared for her, but it was always special when Sadie was her nurse. I just sensed a true deep caring nature in her. She spoke to my friend with such kindness and true concern. Her compassion went past 'just doing her job.'"

She was also described as representing the hospital’s core values – Reverence, Integrity, Compassion and Excellence.

“Sadie’s name is often mentioned in patient satisfaction surveys, call backs and student evaluations as being very kind, professional, caring and helpful. She is a role model for other nurses and is always quick to lend a helping hand or words of encouragement,” said Sherri Doggett, vice president of patient services

Monaghan received recognition at the hospital during National Nurses Week and will be honored with other DAISY Award winners from around the state at a ceremony in Des Moines at a later date.

Three other Mercy nurses were also nominated for the award and were recognized. Sheila Kauzlarich, RN, emergency room, described as cheerful each day, Kauzlarich is often tapped to act as a preceptor for new staff in the ER and she models the Mercy core values of Reverence, Integrity, Compassion and Excellence every day in the care of her patients and to her co-workers.

The nomination for Sue Smith, RN, surgery manager stated that she is an exemplary nurse who goes above and beyond to make sure her patients are comfortable and well-cared for. Smith is always smiling and friendly and she truly cares about her patients as well as her co-workers. Her devotion to her profession is obvious.

Mary Lou Sales, RN, described as a mentor at the hospital for many, many years, was cited for the connection she makes with her patients and co-workers and the respect and trust they have in her.

“Mary Lou cares for the patient and the family and is dedicated to the Mercy Mission,” were just some of the words used to describe her.

The not-for-profit DAISY Foundation was established by the family of J. Patrick Barnes, who died at the age of 33 in late 1999 from complications of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura, a little known auto-immune disease. The care Barnes and his family received from nurses while he was ill inspired this unique means of thanking nurses for the profound difference in the lives of their patients and patient families.