Ad-Express and Daily Iowegian, Centerville, IA

CNHI Special Projects

April 25, 2013

Separating tornado facts from fiction

Whether you live in Tornado Alley or you've never had the misfortune of hearing the wail of a tornado siren, you probably have heard some old wives' tales about twisters. What's true, and what isn't? Here's the breakdown, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration:

Fiction: Lakes, rivers and mountains protect areas from tornadoes.

Fact: No geographic location is safe from tornadoes. A tornado near Yellowstone National Park left a path of destruction up and down a 10,000-foot mountain.


Fiction: A tornado causes buildings to "explode" as it passes overhead.

Fact: Violent winds and debris slamming into buildings cause the most structural damage.


Fiction: Open windows before a tornado approaches to equalize pressure and minimize damage.

Fact: Virtually all buildings leak. Leave windows closed. Take shelter immediately. An underground shelter, basement or safe room are the safest places. Otherwise, go to a windowless interior room.

Information from the National Oceanic and Atomospheric Administration

 

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The Iowegian wants readers to think about building code compliance. One Centerville resident at Monday's City Council meeting proposed the city create two new positions in the police department to only deal with minimum housing and nuisance abatement issues. The city currently has George Johnson as the only employee assigned to enforce building code compliance issues. Does Centerville need more than just Johnson to enforce code compliance issues? So, the question of the week is, "Should Centerville hire additional help to assist George Johnson enforce building code compliance issues?"

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